Interview with Andy Wicks

I set up a permanent space for my gallery Castor Projects at the start of the year in New Cross, S.E London which gives me a differing perspective to, say, that of an artist.

Andy Wicks
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Kate McMillan, 'Stones for Dancing, Stones for Dying', 18 March - 16 April. Photography by John Chase.

At the beginning of 2016, Andy Wicks set up his gallery Castor Projects in New Cross. He also co-runs Sharp Objects, a firm which specialises in gallery design and fabrication. Plinth's new interview series continues with Wicks' view on the London zeitgeist, Van Gogh and his favourite shows of the year.

EW

What do you do? How close to the ‘art world’ do you consider yourself?

AW

I consider myself fortunate to have a rounded experience of the ‘art world’ through my work as an artist, gallerist and technician. I set up a permanent space for my gallery Castor Projects at the start of the year in New Cross, S.E London which gives me a differing perspective to, say, that of an artist. Programming the space and developing the gallery from the ground up could be seen as making my own addition to that world. I also co-run a fabrication firm Sharp Objects, which along with my technician work affords me access to the upper end of London’s commercial art scene and collector base.

EW

How do you define art?

AW

Ubiquitous in its reach, and yet specific enough to present challenges to those who care enough about it in detail.

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Kate McMillan, 'Stones for Dancing, Stones for Dying', 18 March - 16 April. Photography by John Chase.

EW

What’s your earliest memory of visual art?

AW

Making Christmas wish lists of Crayola products from the Argos catalogue and appropriation of Van Gogh’s Sunflowers in Nursery school.

EW

How have your tastes in art changed over the course of your career?

AW

My interests in art have become more complex instead of changing altogether. Taking an overview of the programme at Castor Projects is probably the best indicator of my interest right now, whilst looking at works I’ve collected over the years also shows an evolution. I suppose I’m drawn to artists who have a confidence and awareness in their use of materials.

My earliest memory of visual art is making Christmas wish lists of Crayola products from the Argos catalogue and appropriation of Van Gogh’s Sunflowers in Nursery school.

Andy Wicks
Image1

Kate McMillan, 'Stones for Dancing, Stones for Dying', 18 March - 16 April. Photography by John Chase.

EW

What’s been your favourite exhibition of 2016 so far?

AW

I really haven’t seen many shows away from those at Castor Projects this year and it would be unfair to isolate one of those in particular as they’re all been so brilliant and diverse. I did however manage to see Steven Claydon at Sadie Coles recently which was great.

EW

How would you explain London’s creative zeitgeist at the moment?

AW

Plinth is probably better at describing the zeitgeist of London better than me. I try to look at the creativity in London as a multifaceted experience undertaken by people with questions — people that are curious about a range of subjects using a variety of media and outlets.

Keep up to date with Andy's work by checking castorprojects.co.uk and sharpobjectslondon.com